remembering hugo

I was showing Thomas satellite images of hurricane earl (we’d been talking about the typhoon Tayler is experiencing in Okinawa right now) and was telling him how similar it is to hurricane Hugo the month before he was born. Earl is shaping up to be a monster and is on a similar track as Hugo – although they’re saying because of a high pressure system moving onto the Atlantic coast, earl will brush the coast on Friday morning instead of making landfall like Hugo did. This remains to be seen, of course. Patterns shift, etc, etc.

I was telling Thomas, too, about Sandhi calling after she got telephone service restored. She said, “We’re just fine.” They had a few trees down. But she also said that, “All the pecans that were on the trees in the front yard are now all over the ground in the backyard.” When she came in to see Thomas that November, she brought bags and bags of fresh pecans.

People like to tell me that hurricanes never affect Kentucky. This always makes me laugh. Hurricane Gustav brought us rain from Texas and hurricane Ivan two weeks later brought northern Kentucky and southern Ohio a world of hurt. I lost the pictures i took of the rains and winds we got from Katrina (this makes me very sad!). We had flash floods and winds from Opal in September 1995; and I remember that as being some of the coldest rain this side of Hugo that I’d ever been in (Katrina was much colder than Opal).

Hugo was a monster. I remember him so readily because he did so much damage and because I was so close to having Thomas at the time — in fact, when the rains came through Corbin, I went and stayed at Mommy’s for two days just to be safe and so forth. That and it’s not every day that Corbin, Kentucky, gets hurricane force winds and rain! (although we did get our share of tornadoes and the place still does) Pike County (in the v at the far-eastern edge of Kentucky) got the worst of it. I remember at the time they weren’t real sure just how far Hugo was going to come inland. But he managed to find a pass in the Appalachians and moved on through east of us.

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Author: Mari Adkins

Appalachian gothic fiction writer - my works reflect a love of literature flavored by the darkness and magic residing in these ancient mountains. In my spare time, I'm a Simmer, I tumbl, I journal, but I always have a very strange sense of humor. I have lived away from the mountains and lived deep in the mountains. I currently live in Central Kentucky with my lifepartner and his cat. The mountains, their culture, their superstitions, their particular magics, will always be in my blood.