napping on prozac

I like my naps, I do. They recharge my mind and my body. That and I’m firm in my belief that if I’m falling asleep where I sit, then it’s nap time. Napping has gotten a lot harder since I started on the Prozac at the end of July. But the Prozac does what it’s supposed to do. It wakes me up and gives me the energy I need to make it through a day. This means fewer naps.

This is okay. The therapist I was seeing until I switched to this new one kept telling our panic disorder group that naps were a bad thing – they keep us from sleeping at night, and people like us need all the nighttime sleep we can get.

So Miss Kitty and I have come to an agreement. I say, “It’s nap time,” and she goes with me into the bedroom. She naps whether I do or not. Sometimes a nap for me consists of just lying down for half an hour or an hour – however long I can convince my racing mind to let me ‘rest’. Sometimes a nap really does mean sleep for an hour or two – or more depending on if I need it. Sometimes a nap is “lying down to read”. I’ll take a book with me and do that. Lay down and read for a little while.

Regardless, it still gives my mind and body a much needed break through the day.

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Author: Mari Adkins

Appalachian gothic fiction writer - my works reflect a love of literature flavored by the darkness and magic residing in these ancient mountains. In my spare time, I'm a Simmer, I tumbl, I journal, but I always have a very strange sense of humor. I have lived away from the mountains and lived deep in the mountains. I currently live in Central Kentucky with my lifepartner and his cat. The mountains, their culture, their superstitions, their particular magics, will always be in my blood.